Five facts about endangered turtles

Five Facts About Endangered Turtles


To share with your littlies and get the whole family inspired about conservation!

  The first seeds of conservationism are planted at home! Teaching children to
understand and cherish this precious planet is so important and doesn’t have to
be complicated. Children love sharing stories and facts about the environment
and all the world’s precious creatures and luckily so do we!

Once we start theseconversations with our children we realise they can teach us a thing or two as well (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/czmw21ewkzqt/schools-climate-change-protests).

At the moment, at home in Melbourne with the kids, turtles are top of our dinner
table topics and these cute creatures have even inspired one of the lunch box
designs!
There are seven species of marine turtle. Of these, six are currently endangered
(scientists haven’t enough data on the seventh yet, to know if they are also
threatened with extinction). It’s a scary thought that a creature that has been
around for over 100 million years could totally disappear because of human
caused environmental threats. We must act now if we are to save the turtle. It all
starts with learning more…

Five facts about endangered turtles to share with your little ones…

1. Turtles don’t have any teeth!
They use their peak to tuck into their food.
2. They can hold their breath for up to five hours underwater!
Slowing down their heart beat in order to conserve oxygen.
3. They have built in sat navs!
Sea turtles have an excellent sense of direction – they can detect the earth’s
magnetic field and use it as a compass. Female turtles also always return
home. They come back to the same beach they hatched on to lay their own
eggs, making nests from sand.
4. Their childhood is a mystery.
The time between when a turtle first hatches and returns to sallow water
many years later is incredibly difficult to study. Partly, due to their ability to
swim vast distances. Marine turtles can take on epically long journeys. The
longest known is of a turtle that travelled over 20 miles a day! She swam
from Indonesia to the West coast of America.
5. Turtles are highly endangered and threatened mainly by human activities.
According to WWF it’s estimated that over 50% of turtles have ingested plastic
or some form of human rubbish. Large swathes of plastic washing up on beaches
is also threatening the turtle’s natural habitat – leaving them little space to nest
their eggs. Turtles often get tangled up in fishing lines. To add to this their
underwater home is under threat – the coral reefs that turtles call home is beingdestroyed by human caused climate change. It could disappear completely if we leave it unchecked.

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Help us preserve and protect the ocean for these and other remarkable
creatures! With products you buy you support Surfers Against Sewage
who are tackling plastic pollution.

And, if you would like some more tips for
every day conservationism join our monthly news letter .


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